Detention Center (Overview)

The Detention Division supports the mission and values of the Police Department by securely and humanely maintaining custody of those citizens under our supervision and by preparing them for reintegration into the community through services and programs. The Police Department's Detention Division is overseen by Commanders Tom Hartmann and Shawn Laughlin. 

Detention Center at a Glance:

  • 2001 Square Footage - 53,075 square feet
  • 2001 Project Cost - $13.9 Million 
  • 2010 Expansion Square Footage - 26,250 square feet, 218 inmates (156 males / 54 females / 8 flex) 
  • 2010 Project Cost - $14.9 Million 2019 Transports - 2,909 
  • 2019 Bookings - 3,028 2019 Average Daily Population (ADP) - 89 
  • 2019 Employees - 53 officers / 8 civilians

The Broomfield Detention Center currently operates 80 beds, and an additional 138 beds are held in reserve for when the need arises. Only adults are housed in the Detention Center.

Prior to becoming a City and County, Broomfield Police officers were required to process an arrestee at the department's holding facility and then transport them to one of four county jails (Adams, Boulder, Jefferson, or Weld). This resulted in an inefficient use of time, money, and resources.

In November 1998 statewide voter approval of Amendment C allowed the City of Broomfield to become Colorado's 64th county. With that started the long process of building a Detention Center that would serve the needs of the Broomfield community for many years. Overall goals included incorporating current technology, utilizing the best operational plans, and recruitment. 

The result was the Broomfield Police Department Detention Center & Training Facility, located at 11600 Ridge Parkway in southwest Broomfield. When the doors opened on November 15, 2001, it was a 53,075 square foot facility designed to house 80 inmates. In 2010, the facility was expanded to 79,325 square feet, with an inmate capacity of 218.

The Detention Center's first year of operation resulted in 1,900 arrestees being processed through the facility. With the new Detention Center being within the City and County of Broomfield, arresting officers were able to stay within their own jurisdiction; continuously able to serve Broomfield citizens.

The Detention Center has enjoyed national recognition for its design and operational philosophy. Jail transition teams from throughout the country have visited the facility through the National Institute of Corrections' Planning of New Institutions Workshops to learn what they can from Broomfield's experience.

From the planning stages, Broomfield and surrounding neighborhoods worked together collaboratively to establish certain goals that would lessen the impact of a Detention Center near their community. Through multiple "town meetings" and a good deal of compromising, the various groups were able to accomplish their goals. For example, the facility was designed and built so that portions of the building visible to the public would resemble an office building found in any typical business park. There are no bars on the windows, chain link fences, or barbed wire. Official vehicles are parked behind the facility, away from the public's view. 

Inmates and their housing areas cannot be seen from the surrounding area due to earthen berms that surround the facility. Inmates do not participate in outside recreational activities, and are only allowed outside with an officer escort. 

If a released arrestee/inmate does not have someone to drive them away from the facility, an officer will drive them back to the location of their arrest (if appropriate) or to the local RTD Park N Ride, or the RTD Call N Ride will respond to the Detention Center to transport the former arrestee/inmate to their desired location. Released arrestees/inmates are never allowed to walk off facility property without having arranged transportation. This policy decision was made in response to citizens' concerns about released arrestees/inmates wandering around in their communities. 

Maintaining a strong relationship with the community is important to Broomfield and the Police Department. Since opening, the facility has conducted hundreds of tours to local agencies and citizen groups. The facility pays special attention to youth groups as well as middle and high school students. Striving to make a positive impact on Broomfield's youth is a priority for Broomfield officials.